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Events Calendar

Thu, Apr 24 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Main Street Garden Park, Main Street, Dallas, TX, United States
The Human Scale Free Screening (Dallas)

Sat, Apr 26 - Sun, Apr 27
Fair Park, Dallas, TX, United States
Earth Day Texas

Sat, Apr 26
910 N Main St, Weatherford, TX 76086
Bike Out Hunger Weatherford

Sat, Apr 26 9:00am - 10:00am
1100 Northwest 18th Street, Fort Worth, TX, United States
Public Awareness Bond/CCPD Meeting (Fort Worth)

Sat, Apr 2612:00pm - 3:00pm
Dallas, TX
BikeTexas KidsKup at DORBA Prayer Mountain Pedal

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Advocacy News

National Bike Summit 2014

NBS Texas DelegationEvery year in March, bike advocates from across the nation converge on Washington to swap stories, get inspired, and above all, to meet with their members of Congress. These three days of bike-loving madness are called the National Women's Bicycling Forum and the National Bike Summit.

BikeTexas is delighted to lead the Texas delegation every year as we hear from amazing speakers and network with our colleagues from different parts of the U.S. This year, 16 delegates from Texas went to Washington, DC, for the Forum and Summit. The 2014 theme was "United Spokes: Moving Beyond Gridlock."

The highlight of the Summit every year is Lobby Day, when each delegation heads to Capitol Hill to meet with their senators and representatives. This year's focus was to ask our members of Congress to co-sponsor legislation requiring the Department of Transportation to set performance measures for bicycle and pedestrian safety, similar to the ones already in place for auto traffic fatalities.
The Texas delegation split up into four teams and met with all 38 Texas Congressional offices. A major victory of the day was Representative Beto O'Rourke signing on as a cosponsor to the bill to establish the performance measures after the delegation visited his office.

We'd love to see you there next year! Start making plans now to join the Texas delegation to the 2015 National Bike Summit.

Photo L to R: Michael Payne, Carol Reifsnyder, Mike Kase, Vanessa Bissey-Beard, Preston Tyree, Robin Stallings, Jack Sanford, Erick Benz, Fred Zapalac, Ryan Hanson, Leslie Luciano, Talia McCray, Emma Cravey, Eileen Schaubert.

 

 

Bike Month Proclamation

bike monthFor those of us who love to ride bikes, every month is bike month, and we're not about to argue with that! However, ever since May was first declared Bike Month in 1956, it's been a month of extra celebrations of all things two wheels-- and we're not going to argue with that, either.

Check out the BikeTexas events calendar to see what Bike Month events are happening near you! 

Would your community like to take part in Bike Month, but your local officials aren't sure where to begin? Below is a sample proclamation you can customize to declare that May is Bike Month in your city and across Texas. Let’s make Texas a great place to bike and walk!

#####

The City/County of ____

Proclamation

Whereas, the bicycle is an economical, healthy, convenient, and environmentally sound form of transportation and an excellent tool for recreation and enjoyment of [insert city/county]’s scenic beauty; and

Whereas, throughout the month of May, the residents of [insert city/county] and its visitors will experience the joys of bicycling through educational programs, races, commuting events, charity events, or by simply getting out and going for a ride; and

Whereas, [insert city/county]’s road and trail system attracts bicyclists each year, providing economic health, transportation, tourism, and scenic benefits; and

Whereas, creating a bicycling-friendly community has been shown to improve citizens’ health, well-being, and quality of life, growing the economy of [insert city/county], attracting tourism dollars, improving traffic safety, supporting student learning outcomes, and reducing pollution, congestion, and wear and tear on our streets and roads; and

Whereas, BikeTexas, [insert local bicycle club/ organization/chamber/tourism bureau/regional planning organization], the League of American Bicyclists, schools, parks and recreation departments, police departments, public health districts, hospitals, companies and civic groups will be promoting bicycling during the month of May 2014; and

Whereas, these groups are also promoting bicycle tourism year round to attract more visitors to enjoy our local restaurants, hotels, retail establishments, and cultural and scenic attractions; and

Whereas, these groups are also promoting greater public awareness of bicycle operation and safety education in an effort to reduce collisions, injuries, and fatalities and improve health and safety for everyone on the road; and

Now therefore, I, _____, Mayor/Executive of [insert city/county], do hereby proclaim May 2014 as

Bike Month

in [insert city/county], and I urge all residents to join me in this special observance

Signed this ___ day of May, 2014

Mayor/Executive _______________

   

APBP / NACTO Urban Street Design Guide Webinar Now Available Online

By Karen Dredge, APBP

Cycletrack-1391The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP) and The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) provided a free webinar on the Urban Street Design Guide on November 6th. Over 1000 interested viewers registered and watched it live. APBP now has made the archival recording available to any interested viewer. Go to the APBP home page http://www.apbp.org and click into the NACTO Screen to begin viewing.

During the webinar the leading experts in street design who contributed to the guide's development addressed how this resource will change the face of our nation's streets, the ways you can use it in your community, and how specific topics and elements in the document differ from conventional practice.

The NACTO Urban Street Design Guide charts the principles and practices of the nation’s foremost engineers, planners and designers working in cities today. The Guide offers a blueprint for designing 21st-century streets, and unveils the toolbox and the tactics cities use to make streets safer, more livable, and more economically vibrant.

In this archived webinar, viewers can achieve a better understanding of how and why city streets demand a unique set of design tools specific to their distinct needs and characteristics; how to implement different "interim" design strategies, including parklets, public plazas and temporary safety improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians; how to utilize the guide as a tool for local and state advocacy, including basic information on NACTO's endorsement campaign for the guide.

The webinar presenters are all experts in street design and contributors to The Guide: Michael Flynn, Director of Capital Planning, NYC DOT; Michael King, Principal, Nelson\Nygaard Associates; Peter Koonce, Division Manager, Signals, Street Lighting & ITS, Portland Bureau of Transportation; David Vega-Barachowitz, Director, Designing Cities initiative, NACTO.

The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) represents large cities on transportation issues of local, regional and national significance. NACTO views the transportation departments of major cities as effective and necessary partners in regional and national transportation efforts, promoting their interests in federal decision-making. As a coalition of city transportation departments, NACTO is committed to raising the state of the practice for street design and transportation by building a common vision, sharing data, peer-to-peer exchange in workshops and conferences, and regular communication among member cities. For more information about the organization, visit www.nacto.org.

The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP) provides expertise for sustainable transportation and is the only professional membership organization for the discipline of pedestrian and bicycle transportation. APBP members are employees of all levels of government, consulting firms and non-profits who work in the engineering, planning, landscape architecture, police, safety, health and promotion fields and specialize in improving conditions for bicycling and walking. For more information about the organization, visit www.apbp.org.

   

UPDATE: San Antonio's Loop 1604

Screen Shot 2013-09-23 at 1.11.19 PMOn August 21, 2013, in what was the culmination of a months-long process of advocating for bicycle accommodation on Loop 1604 access roads, the Alamo RMA Board unanimously approved the construction bid for re-striping the road to accommodate a wide outside lane and include signage to alert motorists to the presence of bicyclists.

Prior to construction of the interchange at Loop 1604 and US 281, the access road had an 8' wide shoulder used by many people riding bikes for transportation and recreation. During construction, TxDOT's requirement of three travel lanes instead of two was accommodated by removing the shoulder. After local cyclists alerted BikeTexas to this issue, BikeTexas helped rally dozens of cyclists to attend Alamo RMA Board meetings in February and April 2013.

At first response, engineering staff at the RMA discussed the possibility of a bike lane and bicycle accommodation on the sidewalk where road widths did not allow for a minimum-width bike lane. However, those staff left the RMA during the transition to Bexar County providing staffing for the RMA. BikeTexas subsequently worked with staff at Bexar County, now in charge of RMA operations, to come to agreement over how to accommodate cyclists.

"I’m disappointed...but am not surprised," said Justin Moore, local cycling advocate and LCI, via email when informed of the final design presented by the RMA. Mr. Moore was the first to contact BikeTexas about this issue.

Many in San Antonio have expressed regret over recent road “improvements” that have made things more dangerous for cyclists, such as this access road losing its shoulder. The City of San Antonio and TxDOT both have policies in place that people on bikes should be accommodated in all road projects. The road was safer for people on bikes with an 8' shoulder than a 14' outside lane shared with cars.

A future project along the 1604 corridor could improve the situation. Early projections of what will be included in the build proposal of a project to widen 1604 from I-35 to Bandera Rd include multi-use paths on each side of the corridor to safely accommodate both bicycle and foot traffic.

BikeTexas is remaining vigilant to review any plans for this corridor and will alert our networks of any chance to comment.

In the meantime, if you are unhappy with the reduction in safety of bicycling along the access road of 1604 between 281 and Blanco, BikeTexas encourages you to contact TxDOT and file a complaint or email the Alamo RMA at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

   

El Paso Bike Share Forges On

Thursday, 19 September 2013 12:50

El Paso MPO MeetingEl Paso cyclists have passed through yet another hurdle standing between them and a bike share program in the city: At the September 13 El Paso MPO meeting, a request from TxDOT to deprogram the bike share was on the agenda.

Velo Paso swung into action, alerting local cyclists and BikeTexas to this new threat. We were happy to join with Velo Paso to get the word out and rally local cyclist to contact the local Transportation Policy Board and attend the meeting to show support for bike share in El Paso. The transportation blog Streetsblog also weighed in, wondering if TxDOT has the authority to stop the bike share project.

In a packed house for the meeting, the El Paso MPO voted to say no to TxDOT's request. Scott White with Velo Paso wrote, "You did it, El Paso! TxDOT still refuses to release the federal funds, and we will continue to work on that, but for now, know that your support made today’s victory possible." 

Keep an eye on Velo Paso for more updates about bike share in El Paso.

Photo credit: Kristofer Johnson

   

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